Website Search
ID 1244

Temporal Lobe

Description:
The temporal lobes contain a large number of substructures, whose functions include perception, face recognition, object recognition, memory, language, and emotion.
Transcript:
The temporal lobes contain a large number of substructures, whose functions include perception, face recognition, object recognition, memory acquisition, understanding language, and emotional reactions. Damage to the temporal lobes can result in intriguing neurological deficits called agnosias, which refer to the inability to recognize specific categories (body parts, colors, faces, music, smells).
Keywords:
temporal, lobe, 3d, brain, cortex, recognition, memory, language, face, perception, emotion
Creative Commons License This work by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

Related content:

872. Autism Neuropathology
Autism is not associated with any single deficit in the brain.
2116. Middle and Inferior Temporal Gyri
The middle and inferior temporal gyri are involved in cognitive processes, including semantic memory, language, visual perception, and sensory integration.
2238. Perception
A overview of perception-related content on Genes to Cognition Online.
854. Einstein's Brain
Einstein's brain, was it different to yours?
2022. G2C 3-D Brain
The G2C Brain consists of 30 interactive 3-D structures with information on associated functions, disorders, related brain damage, case studies, and links to contemporary research.
2113. Occipital Lobe
The occipital cortex is the primary visual area of the brain. It has different groups of neurons that separately encode color, orientation, and motion information.
1129. Frontal Lobe
The frontal lobe is part of the cerebral cortex and is the largest of the brain's structures. It is the main site of so–called 'higher' cognitive functions.
2119. Perirhinal Cortex
The perirhinal cortex plays an important role in object recognition and in storing information (memories) about objects. It is highly connected to other brain structures.
822. The Amygdala, the Body's Alarm Circuit
The amygdala controls autonomic responses associated with fear, arousal, and emotional stimulation and has been linked to anxiety disorder and social phobias.
1142. Hippocampus - Familiarity and Recollection
Professor Howard Eichenbaum explains that different brain structures within the medial temporal lobe support different memory processes, namely familiarity and recollection.
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
CSHL HomeAbout CSHLResearchEducationNews & FeaturesCampus & Public EventsCareersGiving