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ID 1985

Living a normal life: bipolar disorder

Description:
Professor James Potash explains that most individuals with bipolar disorder lead normal lives and respond well to lithium medication.
Transcript:
Yes, it is absolutely very possible for people with bipolar disorder to live normal lives, in fact roughly two-thirds of people with bipolar disorder respond extremely well to treatment. Lithium is still the medication that is most likely to help people with bipolar disorder, although there are a number of other medicines that are helpful too. The majority of people who have bipolar disorder are well most of the time; it’s a minority, maybe 15 percent who are chronically ill and who are quite disabled by the illness.
Keywords:
bipolar disorder, lithium, normal life, james, potash
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